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Archive for April, 2009

business relationships

SynergyBlog has found a great post regarding the importance of corporate reputation – how to earn it and how to maintain it.

Referencing the demise of many corporate reputations, according Edleman Trust Barometer, a number of Britain’s most admired leaders sat down to discuss the maintenance of a good name…

The full transcript of the panel can be found in Management Today. Enjoy the post!

A recent trust survey confirmed that management has lost public respect. It’s not just individual businesses in the firing line, but business itself. MT brought together Most Admired leaders and other practitioners to debate the issue of how to hang onto your good name…

MATTHEW GWYTHER – Where better to start on a discussion of reputation than with Shakespeare? Iago may be a thoroughly disreputable character, but he has some sound words (Othello, III.3) on the value of character:

Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,

Is the immediate jewel of their souls:
Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing;
‘Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed.

The concept of reputation or honour was around for thousands of years before Fred Goodwin. But nowadays it has moved from the individual to the corporate realm, to the point where it is one of the most important things that faces business organisations.

We’re interested in corporate reputation today – not only of individual businesses but of business generally and how this may have been affected by the downturn. Certainly, inasmuch as it is aligned to the subject of trust in business, it has taken a battering – as a recent Edelman Barometer of Trust survey confirmed. (more…)

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The Storyteller, 1874 (oil on canvas)We just love Seth Godin around here. He’s one of those guys in “marketing” (whatever that is anymore) who make us proud to also be part of the “marketing” world (still, whatever that is).

Seth pulled out a piece today which both discusses the importance of telling a compelling story and the need for that story to be true, authentic, and TRUSTED.

He says that “TRUST IS THE SCARCEST RESOURE WE’VE GOT LEFT.” Yet, he aknowledges we can’t be very successful without it.

I hope you love this peice as much as we do. And check out Seth’s Blog as often as is humanly possible!

Ode: How to tell a great story by Seth Godin

Chris Fralic reminded me of this piece I wrote for Ode.

Great stories succeed because they are able to capture the imagination of large or important audiences.

A great story is true. Not necessarily because it’s factual, but because it’s consistent and authentic. Consumers are too good at sniffing out inconsistencies for a marketer to get away with a story that’s just slapped on.

Great stories make a promise. They promise fun, safety or a shortcut. The promise needs to be bold and audacious. It’s either exceptional or it’s not worth listening to.

Great stories are trusted. Trust is the scarcest resource we’ve got left. No one trusts anyone. People don’t trust the beautiful women ordering vodka at the corner bar (they’re getting paid by the liquor company). People don’t trust the spokespeople on commercials (who exactly is Rula Lenska?). And they certainly don’t trust the companies that make pharmaceuticals (Vioxx, apparently, can kill you). As a result, no marketer succeeds in telling a story unless he has earned the credibility to tell that story. (more…)

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TRUSTThis is a piece from the Academy Leadership that SynergyBlog feels they could have written themselves. It’s that good.

We’ll not pontificate. Please read, and in doing so, may your organizations and relationships thrive.

Enjoy. Trust… and be Trusted!

From the Academy Leadership: In its simplest form, trust can be described as the belief that those on whom we depend will meet our positive expectations of them. While this may sound the same as confidence, they are different. Trust is not always rooted in past experience with others, whereas confidence generally results from specific experiences with people and is built on reason and fact. In contrast, trust is based in part on faith. We sometimes give our trust in spite of evidence that suggests we should feel some caution, if not outright suspicion, about relying on another.

Business realities now require that more power be given to those with close contacts with very discriminating consumers. No longer can the few powerful people at the top make all decisions and take all actions. Most companies now realize that they must provide people at lower levels increasing latitude in order to react promptly to demanding market forces and to progress and prosper. Thus, they must trust people to do the right thing. To do otherwise could well spell disaster for the future. Leaders can lead only to the extent that they are allowed to lead by their followers. When people believe that they are not trusted, or lack trust in their leaders, they will actively or passively resist what the team is trying to accomplish. Thus, a leader’s options are limited by excessive and ongoing mistrust among employees. (more…)

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SynergyBlog has found a guest blog post from our friends at MarketingProfs that we think is extremely valuable for corporations and nonprofits interested in building trusted brands. The key is to remain as close to your consumer as possible. To engage in interactive and intelligent dialogue that moves both the organization and the consumer forward.

Len Kendal does a terrific job of sharing what corporations can learn from President Obama. We think he’s right…

by Len Kendall

Depending on how you look at it, the U.S. Government is one of the largest companies in the world. On March 24th, the “CEO” of this “company” utilized a Digg-Like voting system to address the most common questions that American’s had on their minds.

More than 13,000 different questions were submitted and 400,000 votes were cast to help filter the most pressing to the top. Clearly, there was no shortage of opportunity. By implementing this system, Obama used the will of the crowd to:

1) Shape the topics of discussion when addressing the nation
2) Show the crowd that the oval office is acknowledging their importance in driving the country’s success.
3) Illustrate transparency and democratization of modern government (more…)

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