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Posts Tagged ‘Trust’

The Storyteller, 1874 (oil on canvas)We just love Seth Godin around here. He’s one of those guys in “marketing” (whatever that is anymore) who make us proud to also be part of the “marketing” world (still, whatever that is).

Seth pulled out a piece today which both discusses the importance of telling a compelling story and the need for that story to be true, authentic, and TRUSTED.

He says that “TRUST IS THE SCARCEST RESOURE WE’VE GOT LEFT.” Yet, he aknowledges we can’t be very successful without it.

I hope you love this peice as much as we do. And check out Seth’s Blog as often as is humanly possible!

Ode: How to tell a great story by Seth Godin

Chris Fralic reminded me of this piece I wrote for Ode.

Great stories succeed because they are able to capture the imagination of large or important audiences.

A great story is true. Not necessarily because it’s factual, but because it’s consistent and authentic. Consumers are too good at sniffing out inconsistencies for a marketer to get away with a story that’s just slapped on.

Great stories make a promise. They promise fun, safety or a shortcut. The promise needs to be bold and audacious. It’s either exceptional or it’s not worth listening to.

Great stories are trusted. Trust is the scarcest resource we’ve got left. No one trusts anyone. People don’t trust the beautiful women ordering vodka at the corner bar (they’re getting paid by the liquor company). People don’t trust the spokespeople on commercials (who exactly is Rula Lenska?). And they certainly don’t trust the companies that make pharmaceuticals (Vioxx, apparently, can kill you). As a result, no marketer succeeds in telling a story unless he has earned the credibility to tell that story. (more…)

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TRUSTThis is a piece from the Academy Leadership that SynergyBlog feels they could have written themselves. It’s that good.

We’ll not pontificate. Please read, and in doing so, may your organizations and relationships thrive.

Enjoy. Trust… and be Trusted!

From the Academy Leadership: In its simplest form, trust can be described as the belief that those on whom we depend will meet our positive expectations of them. While this may sound the same as confidence, they are different. Trust is not always rooted in past experience with others, whereas confidence generally results from specific experiences with people and is built on reason and fact. In contrast, trust is based in part on faith. We sometimes give our trust in spite of evidence that suggests we should feel some caution, if not outright suspicion, about relying on another.

Business realities now require that more power be given to those with close contacts with very discriminating consumers. No longer can the few powerful people at the top make all decisions and take all actions. Most companies now realize that they must provide people at lower levels increasing latitude in order to react promptly to demanding market forces and to progress and prosper. Thus, they must trust people to do the right thing. To do otherwise could well spell disaster for the future. Leaders can lead only to the extent that they are allowed to lead by their followers. When people believe that they are not trusted, or lack trust in their leaders, they will actively or passively resist what the team is trying to accomplish. Thus, a leader’s options are limited by excessive and ongoing mistrust among employees. (more…)

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TRUST: EssentialAmerican consumers and stakeholders find reasons to distrust business, political, and civic leaders every time they tune into CNN or other news outlets.

However, there’s been an unintended consequence: The diminishment of integrity in leaders has given voice to the presence of integrity in the rest of us!

Despite the global financial challenges that we face, there are reasons for optimism.

SynergyBlog is pleased that trust in leadership and trust in each other is becoming an integral part of the daily business discourse.

Today, like so many other days, I witnessed incredible sensitivity, tremendous integrity, and a spirit of giving we never hear about in the news… all in the context of commerce.

I witnessed corporations interested in sustainable practices; companies really interested in consumer needs and desires; organizations interested in the bottom line – and so much more. These virtues all demonstrated by business and civic leaders!

When we look around, it’s easy to point out the violations of trust – they’re everywhere. Perhaps we should sometimes do the harder thing and pay attention when colleagues, leaders, and everyday people do the right thing.

There’s a great peice on brand trust in Forbes by leadership guru Ken Blanchard and author and consultant Terry Waghorn that speaks to this. See the full article here:

How do you keep people trusting you at a time like this? Trust is essential in our lives, and it has been since the beginning of our country. Our dollar bills say In God We Trust. Yet today trust is all but vanishing, especially trust in our business leaders, whose greed and short-term selfishness seem to have been a major cause of our economic crisis. With negativity running amok, it is no small wonder that trust within the organizational context is slipping.

Yet that need not be the case. “Managed properly, trust can actually grow in such adverse conditions,” says Shawna O’Grady, associate professor of management at Queens School of Business, in Kingston, Ontario. “Taking this point to the extreme, consider the bonds forged between comrades-in-arms in a theater of war.”

The key to building trust in both good and bad times is to realize that none of us is as smart as all of us. There are companies that have embraced this simple truth and used it to maintain trust before, during and, we’re sure, after this economic downturn. All these companies seem to have two characteristics in common. (more…)

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President ObamaPresident Obama’s director of the National Economic Council, Lawrence Summers, spoke to a forum on Friday and said that the nation’s economic crisis has led to an “excess of fear” among Americans that must be broken to reverse the downturn.

Mr. Summers stated that, “Fear begets fear,” and that “is the paradox at the heart of the financial crisis.”

“It is this transition from an excess of greed to an excess of fear that President Roosevelt had in mind when he famously observed that the only thing we had to fear was fear itself,” Summer said. “It is this transition that has happened in the United States today.”

Summers spoke amid new signs of a deepening recession. The U.S. trade deficit plunged in January to the lowest level in six years as the economic downturn cut America’s demand for imported goods, the Commerce Department reported Friday.

The economic adviser said it’s still too early to gauge the broad impact of the president’s recovery program.

“But it is modestly encouraging that since it began to take shape, consumer spending in the U.S., which was collapsing during the holiday season, appears, according to a number of indicators, to have stabilized,” Summers told the Brookings Institution, a think tank.

Summers was asked by a member of the audience what the nation’s business community could do to help speed the recovery.

“What we need today is more optimism and more confidence,” Summers said.

SynergyBlog agrees – and we’ve decided that we are going to do our part to end the recession by not allowing it to self-fulfill.

We need to establish trust in the marketplace and in our organizations. To do that we must do the following:

  1. Deliver Excellence in the products we make and services we provide. Every time.
  2. Exude a level of Goodwill that can be detected in the things we do and say. Is it that difficult to help a neighbor or a colleague in need?
  3. Maintain the highest level of Ethical Standards in your industry sector. Promote integrity in word and deed.
  4. Create Value for our clients, constituents, strategic partners, and colleagues. Ask yourself daily, “Have I delivered on my brand promise?”
  5. Listen to the needs of stakeholders and act on what you hear. Responsiveness can make the difference between success and failure in these economic times.

By continuing to exemplify trustworthiness in the marketplace, we fuel the engine of confidence in the economy. One business at a time.

See the full AP story here.

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bankingA fascinating headline in the AP tonight. The top bankers in the U.S. are now concentrating on rebuilding the public trust.

We are certainly going to be watching. In our opinion, there is nothing more important in this crisis than the public trust – and it has been violated with impunity.

The leaders of our financial institutions would be well-served to learn a valuable lesson. Stakeholder trust that you earn by leading with integrity, making sound business decisions, and exuding compassion and respect to valued stakeholders is far more important than short-term profits.

Lead. Thrive. Trust and be Trusted! (more…)

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Here is an interesting piece by Dr. Anthony DiBella about the need for trusted leadership. Enjoy. Thrive. Trust and be Trusted.

In their efforts to manage the ups and downs of the business cycle, economists often talk about the need for soft landings. During the past six months, what seemed like that has turned into a major crash that continues to spiral downward. When will the tunnel digging end? How do we create a financial phoenix and turn the nose of our economic flight upwards again?

It should be clear by now that the $750-billion bailout package passed by Congress last year was a case of don’t just stand there, do something. In a society that values action over reflection, there are major pressures on our politicians to act (fire first, aim later). Action is vital, but if not guided by rigorous and valid analysis, can cause more harm than good. The bailout money given to the financial sector was intended to free up credit. Instead, it’s been used primarily for private rather than social gain, and we are worse off now than before.

With Capitol Hill and Smith Hill planning more initiatives, we need to think clearly about underlying causes and tipping points. Many pundits claim they know what will get us moving again, to turn our economic ship, to grow rather than regress. Some say it will require an upturn in the housing market, others say employment. The Fed thought that lowering interest rates would do the trick, but rates now are as low as they will ever be unless the Fed wants to give us money for free. Conservatives and libertarians think the times call for tax cuts. (more…)

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Trust as CompetencyThis article is brought to you by one of our heroes: Mr. Stephen M. R. Covey.

As we develop Synergy’s Return on Trust model, we highlight examples of increased trust driving business performance, customer loyalty, and employee passion – even in our most difficult economic times. Enjoy. Thrive. Trust and Be Trusted.

“The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
– Marcel Proust, French novelist

One of the most significant things today’s leaders and organizations can do to achieve and sustain superior performance is to look at “trust” through new eyes.

Typically, trust is assumed, taken for granted, misunderstood and severely underestimated. As the French proverb says, “Fish discover water last.” In other words, fish are so immersed in the presence of water that they are unaware of its existence – until the water gets too low or becomes polluted. In the same way, people discover trust last. We become so immersed in the presence of trust that we take its existence for granted – until the trust gets dangerously low or polluted. Then we become painfully aware of the effects of its poor quality or absence. (more…)

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